One of the new challenges I faced at my new job was understanding and adapting to DDD. It can be a bit confusing at first, but as soon as I made sense of it, I couldn’t not recommend it.

In this post i want to explain the basic concept of DDD.

What is DDD?

DDD consists in one domain project that doesn’t depend on anything, while the other projects depend on it. Usually, the domain project contains interfaces, domain entities and utility classes that don’t depend on third parties. Confusing? I’ll explain better in the example below.

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A lot advanced programmers certainly have heard of this two big words, Dependency Injection (DI) & Inversion of Control (IoC). Mainly known as very desirable pattern for solutions on software projects because they enable a nice and clean architecture and loosely cloupling between the various software components.

But before I start giving a big speech about DI & IoC, first I’ll start with a pratical example, using C# (because Ninject was implemented for .NET), to explain what really are this big two words. Then I’ll talk about the practical application of Ninject, and the importance of these two patterns, and also give a little example on how to use the Ninject Extension MVC, to allow the usage of this two patterns on your ASP.NET MVC application. So let’s start with the example…

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